Vilauristre

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Vilauristre
Royal Capital City
The view of the inner harbor of Vilauristre
The view of the inner harbor of Vilauristre
Country Burgundie flag.png Great Principality of Burgundie
Province Burgundie County Flag.png Principality of Burgundie
Settled circa 930AD
Incorporated circa 1003AD
Bydeler
Government
 • Borgermester Kurt Klienersen
Population 8,500,000


History

Vilauristre' inner harbor in 1860

First settled in the 4th or 5th century BC by Levzeish peoples, the city was formally incorporated in 1247 and then elevated to city status in 1478. It has served as an important trading hub in the northern Levantine circuit since its settlement and has been the capital of 4 civilizations or nations. It was a second city to NordHalle until the Kingdom of Culfra selected it as their provincial capital in 1462. It has almost always been the most populous urban area on the Isle of Burgundie, but following its naming as the capital of Kuhlfrosi Burgundie, it boomed and has remained the largest city in Burgundie. Following its modernization in the late-1800s, it was one of the few metropolitan areas with a population already over one million residents. After the Great Cronan War, the population boomed again and has been growing steadily ever since.

Vilauristre has served as the political and administrative capital of the Burgundie since 1462, more or less. There were a few instances where the government evacuated the city to avoid riots, mobs or military incursion, but for the most part, the legacy of government has always rested in the city. During the period of the Trade Company Empires, Vilauristre was catapulted into the world of global politics. It became only regionally important following the independence of Burgundie at the cost of its overseas empire in Punth. Wallowing in relative obscurity for the next century Vilauristre played second fiddle to NordHalle, which took on a global role during the Trade Route Empire. As the 20th century dawned and the country embarked on the era known locally as the Pax Burgundia, Vilauristre clawed its way back into the spotlight. Particularly in the aftermath of the Great Cronan War, Vilauristre, emerging entirely unscathed, steadily grew its influence as a global intermediary and negotiation center.

Today the city is vibrant and diverse with a massive population. Urban renewal is pervasive and greenovation has taken the development of the city by storm. While green space is fairly accessible to most residents the high density of the city means that most buildings are multi-family, mid or high-rise, with single-family homes only accounting for 2.1% of the total residential market. Also due to the population density, most mid and high rise buildings are multi-use. The first one or two stories being commercial with a residential tower above is a common layout in the city. Problems with drug abuse, homelessness, and poverty are prevalent in some of the lower-class neighborhoods, but a very strong and well funded Department of Public Health and Social Resiliency keep the numbers of residents suffering those indignities at proportionally low rates.

Ancient Settlement

The first permanent settlement near Vilauristre is suspected to be the Levzeish port of Biscainhos. Archaeological evidence dug up during the city's mass transit system construction in the 1940s, suggests that the first semi-permanent structures were erected around the early 5th century BC, but that non-permanent structures predate these by at least a century. The Latinic culture formally arrived in 284BC, following the early expeditions of Paulus Marialanus. The Latinics called the port Biscania and formed a trade alliance with the Levzeish tribes on the island.

Modernization

Main Haussmann's renovation of Paris

Vilauristre Defensive Positions

A view of Castell Burgone
Castell Flanq

The Vilauristre Defensive Positions were a late 19th century scheme of earthwork fortifications in the south-east of Burgundie, designed to protect Vilauristre from foreign invasion landing on the south coast. The positions were a carefully surveyed contingency plan for a line of entrenchments, which could be quickly excavated in a time of emergency. The line to be followed by these entrenchments was supported by thirteen permanent small polygonal forts or redoubts called Vilauristre Mobilization Centers, which were equipped with all the stores and ammunition that would be needed by the troops tasked with digging and manning the positions.

An 1847 report on Burgundie's defenses believed that Vilauristre was practically undefendable. Following a number of proposals by senior military figures, an 1867 memorandum envisaged a scheme of simple earthworks for infantry and movable armaments, intended to be dug and manned in an emergency by the militia, the line being supported by permanent works, the Vilauristre Mobilization Centers, at 8km intervals, which acted as stores and magazines.

Castell Biscaine showing its commanding position high on the coast of Biscaine Bay.

The Vilauristre Mobilization Centers were built along a 113-kilometer stretch of the Biscaine Bay's coastline. The design of each of the 13 permanent forts site varied, but they were never very elaborate, just a magazine and storehouses for the mobilization of troops, with limited defenses. The intention was that the centers would, in addition to holding ammunition and other supplies, act as strong points in an almost continuous line of field fortifications.The trench lines joining the Defense Positions could be rapidly excavated on the outbreak of war.

What To Eat

Traditional Cuisine

Pukhtunkhwan Cuisine

Fusion Food

Fast Food

Night Life

Jazz Clubs

Night Clubs

Festivals

Where To Stay

Historic Sights

Getting To and From Vilauristre

Getting Around Vilauristre

Working In Vilauristre

Living In Vilauristre

Sister Cities

Vilauristre City Council maintains sister city relations with the following cities: