International Racing Federation

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International Racing Federation
Abbreviation IRF
Type Sports federation for auto racing
Legal status Voluntary association
Purpose/focus Motorists' issues
Motorsports
Membership 39 national organizations
President Johann Mort
Affiliations
  • Grand Prix Racing Series
  • Stock Racing Series
  • Moto Racing Series

The International Racing Federation (IRF) is a voluntary association that governs both the operation of numerous racing series globally as well as representing the interests of motorists, vehicle manufacturers, and road safety around the globe; though it is much better known publicly for its activities as the former. As an international organization, the IRF maintains offices in 39 countries around the world with a rotating headquarters.

The IRF is best known for the Grand Prix Racing series and Stock Racing series which it administrates, licenses, and arbitrates. In addition to its oversight of racing and advocacy for numerous issues, the IRF also has international administration over the certification of land speed record attempts. The IRF has recognition as a sporting association from a majority of other international sporting associations.

History

The International Racing Federation (IRF) was founded at the beginning of the 20th century explicitly to govern international automobile races. The beginning of automobile racing ultimately began with the invention of the automobile as even the earliest models of motor vehicles competed for top speeds. Professional motorsports briefly preceded the advent of commercial vehicles and competitions quickly expanded beyond national borders necessitating standardization or at the very least oversight. The IRF would fulfil this role, though it remains and has always been a voluntary federation and no national or international laws mandate the oversight or rulings of the IRF in any particular competition.

The IRF's first role in motorsports was simply to assure the safety of both tracks and vehicles involved in races. It wasn't until the 1920s when the IRF also began to regulate prizes and wins through the control of prize money and the standardization of point attribution for every race. In the early days of motorsports when there were few if any distinctions between stock cars and open-wheeled racecars the IRF counted points from all categories toward a single World Drivers Championship even if the races were in different categories including rally racing, hillclimbing, endurance racing, oval racing, and grand prix circuit racing . In this era, a driver who would compete in every single IRF-governed event would be the exception and events could even coincide. It wouldn't be until 1950 that the IRF would separate categories between stock racing, grand prix racing, and endurance racing each with separate championships, standardized regulations for the series rather than per-race, and set calendars.

In 1999, the IRF acquired and merged the International Motorcycle Racing Federation (IMRF) into its existing organization and began administering the Moto Racing series as the IMRF had since 1949. All existing records and standards in the 50 years before the IRF's acquisition have been maintained by the newer administration.

Grand Prix Racing

Grand Prix Racing
GPR Logo.png
Category Single seater
Country International
Inaugural season 1950
Drivers 14
Constructors 7
Drivers' champion Jacob Asana
Constructors' champion Corse Hermès S.A.
Official website www.GrandPrixRacing.ix
Motorsport current event.svg Current season

Grand Prix Racing is the name given to the open-wheeled category of races governed by the IRF. First held in 1950, the Grand Prix Series is the oldest continuous racing series. Held annually from March to November, the calendar tours the globe over sixteen events. Races are held on a variety of circuits with varying conditions. This creates diverse experiences and challenges for drivers and fans each race weekend for the duration of each series. One of the fastest series in the world, the open-wheeled cars may be outdone in a straight line by other vehicles, but carry immense speed into corners and can lap a circuit faster than any other. Cars in Grand Prix Racing may reach speeds as fast as 380 km/h (236 mi/h). The series is the highest level of open-wheeled racing and is considered one of the most prestigious sports around the world. With a global audience, thousands of fans attend events in person while others watch television feeds translated into approximately a dozen languages. The cumulative live viewership of the 2030 season surpassed 60 billion.










Events

Insuian Grand Prix

Grande Prêmio do Insui
Circuito de Georgetown
Austin circuit.svg
Race information
Number of times held 55
First held 1976
Last held 2031
Most wins (drivers) Yytuskia Gustav Landolf (6)
Most wins (constructors) Corse Hermès S.A. (13)
Circuit length 5.52 km (3.427 mi)
Race length 308.405 km (191.634 mi)
Laps 56
Last race (2031)
Pole position
Podium
Fastest lap

The Insuian Grand Prix (Portuguese: Grande Prêmio do Insui) is an annual Grand Prix Series motor race held on the Circuito de Georgetown, a purpose-built circuit in the Harper Valley. Run since 1976, it is widely considered to be one of the most important and prestigious automobile races in the world. For most of its history, the race has traditionally been held in March. It is one of the longest continuously-running events in auto racing. The track has many elevation changes and tight corners as well as a tunnel, making it one of the most demanding tracks in the IRF. In spite of the relatively low average speeds, it is a dangerous place to race and often involves the intervention of a safety car.

The race under artificial lights starts at 8 pm local time, which is the standard time for equatorial areas, moderating the extreme daytime apparent temperature in the tropical climate. Even so, cockpit temperatures can reach 60 °C (140 °F).

























Palmerian Grand Prix

Gran Premio de Palmeria
Circuit de Bartalunya
Catalunya.svg
Race information
Number of times held 95
First held 1931
Last held 2031
Most wins (drivers) Olav Kinston (6)
Most wins (constructors) Corse Hermès S.A. (13)
Circuit length 4.655 km (2.892 mi)
Race length 307.23 km (190.87 mi)
Laps 66
Last race (2031)
Pole position
Podium
    • 2. Pauldustllah Daniel Richards
    • Pauldustllah Imperial Cola Racing
    • +0.699
    • 3. Caphiria Maxim Verstellus
    • Pauldustllah Imperial Cola Racing
    • +6.512
Fastest lap
  • Caphiria Maxim Verstellus
  • Pauldustllah Imperial Cola Racing
  • 1:32.593

The Palmerian Grand Prix (Spanish: Gran Premio de Palmeria) is hosted annually at the Circuit de Bartalunya. The race runs 307.23 km over 66 laps in a relatively arid location. The consistent climate and well-rounded circuit has led to the Circuit de Bartalunya hosting pre-season testing since shortly after the track was opened in the 1991. The circuit is well balanced with a long straightaway through the start/finish line with even and predictable turns which allow drivers to extract peak performance from their vehicles. Many of the corners on the track are well-suited for overtaking which leads to highly dynamic races.

Palmeria has hosted a grand prix since the 1930s making it one of the oldest events on the grand prix calendar. These events have been used as opportunities for Palmeria to promote local culture and demonstrate the successes of Palmerian society. Race sessions are regularly attended by prominent Palmerian figures and politicians.






















Monteangeline Grand Prix

Grand Prezi da Monteangelo
Circuit da Mont Anghel
Circuit da Mont Anghel.png
Race information
Number of times held 59
First held 1972
Last held 2031
Most wins (drivers) Nils Mandell (7)
Most wins (constructors) Corse Hermès S.A. (7)
Circuit length 3.975 km (2.470 mi)
Race length 363.775 km (226.039 mi)
Laps 89
Last race (2031)
Pole position
Podium
Fastest lap
  • Caphiria Maxim Verstellus
  • Pauldustllah Imperial Cola Racing
  • 1:00.223

The Monteangeline Grand Prix (Romansch: Grand Prezi da Monteangelo) is a Grand Prix Series motor race held annually on the Circuit da Mont Anghel, a purpose-built circuit along the slopes of Mount Anghel, the tallest mountain and namesake of the island and nation of Monteangelo. The original race track extended over 8 kilometres and was raced in 44 laps extending around the peak of the mountain. However, uncontrollable rock slides and the sharps drop offs along the track presented dangers of both tire punctures and falls. Following the death of driver Ricard Foch in 1980, races were postponed a number of years while track officials attempted to improve the safety of the course. Ultimately, the circuit was shortened to the southern portion of the track creating the form which is recognized today.

The circuit is characterized by its elevation changes and four tight hairpin turns. The course also has a notably high proportion of bus-stop chicanes. The tight turns followed by rapid accelerations and decelerations makes the race difficult on gearboxes. At 2,026 km above sea level, the relatively rarefied air also presents unique challenges. While there is less air resistance at this altitude enabling rapid acceleration and lower drag, the reduced airflow creates issues for engine and break temperatures despite the temperate climate and typically overcast conditions in the Monteangeline highlands.





















Reçêpistan Grand Prix

Lezariye Grand Prix'si
Tuzla Park
Istanbul park.svg
Race information
Number of times held 21
First held 2000
Last held 2031
Most wins (drivers) Insui Jacob Asana (4)
Most wins (constructors) Corse Hermès S.A. (6)
Circuit length 5.334 km (3.314 mi)
Race length 309.396 km (192.250 mi)
Laps 58
Last race (2031)
Pole position
  • Pauldustllah Daniel Richards
  • Pauldustllah Imperial Cola Racing
  • 1:21.498
Podium
Fastest lap
  • Daniel Richards
  • Pauldustllah Imperial Cola Racing
  • 1:26.152

The Reçêpistan Grand Prix (Lezariye Grand Prix'si) is a race which has been intermittently held since 2000 despite outbursts of violence in the region. Held on a street course in Ashkagbat, the flat circuit comprises 14 turns over 5.338 km (3.317 mi) in counter-clockwise direction. The turns of the track flow very readily, but the surface of the track is typically abrasive which makes tire management vital for the duration of the race's 58 laps. Air quality also tends to be poor and of the race's several cancellations, two have been due to dust storms interrupting the race weekend. The simple layout of the circuit allows drivers to extract the maximum potential of their cars and race results frequently reflect this.

Political tensions and conflict have presented a perennial threat to the holding of the Grand Prix which has nevertheless attracted significant audiences. The race was initially set to debut in 1999, but contract disputes with the IRF put off the inaugural race to the next year. The initial contracting of the circuit sponsored by the Recépi government was supposed to extend for a decade but was cancelled in 2008 after the 2007 event was called off due to threats of military conflict. In 2010 after a four-year absence, the event was revived for the 2011 season. The event enjoyed an uninterrupted run into the mid-2020s with the exception of two cancellations due to dust storms in 2018 and 2021. External conflicts again came into play and the circuit was once again absent from the calendar between 2026 and 2029 only to return in 2030 for the foreseeable future.



















Kazirstani Grand Prix

Thiss'vii'chuh Kazirstani
Ai'thii-Zii'chanthooyuh Autodrome
Korea international circuit v3.svg
Race information
Number of times held 0
First held N/A
Last held N/A
Circuit length 5.615 km (3.48 mi)
Race length 308.825 km (191.4 mi)
Laps 55

The 2031 season of Grand Prix Racing brings the inaugural Kazirstani Grand Prix (Kazirstani: Thiss'vii'chuh Kazirstani) to the world stage held at the Ai'thii-Zii'chanthooyuh Autodrome in the city of Karakol. The government of Kazirstan constructed the circuit and grounds at the Ai'thii-Zii'chanthooyuh Autodrome with the express purpose of hosting a venue for an international event and demonstrating the prestige of Kazirstan. The location's maritime climate is relatively temperate, but light to heavy rainfall is common for most of the year.

The 5.6 km circuit is average in terms of length for urban circuits and notably has three successive long straights separated by two hairpins, zigzagging through the last sector of the race. The rest of the circuit forms a typical array of chicanes and corners which emphasize driver ability compared to the power-demanding straights toward the end of the race.










Levantx Grand Prix

Grand Premi de Levantx
Circuit de Port Levantia
Circuit de Port Levantia.png
Race information
Number of times held 77
First held 1954
Last held 2031
Most wins (drivers) Nils Mandell (5)
Most wins (constructors) Corse Hermès S.A. (15)
Circuit length 3.337 km (2.074 mi)
Race length 266.96 km (165.92 mi)
Laps 80
Last race (2031)
Pole position
Podium
Fastest lap
  • Kistan Lucian Walsh
  • Kistan Target Motorsports
  • 1:16.268

The Levantx Grand Prix (Burgundian: Levantx Grand Premi) is a Grand Prix Series motor race held each year on the streets of Port Levantia, Levantx a Burgundian territory in the midst of the Levantine Ocean. The race has been run since 1954 and is considered to have a rising importance to the Grand Prix Series circuit. Since the 1990s the course has become known for its "exceptional grandeur, technicality, and growing prestige."

The race is held on a narrow course laid out in the streets of Port Levantia, with many elevation changes and harrowing hairpin turns. This tends to lead to a "slower race overall" but both the difficulty and stunning views lend to a rather dramatic effect on racegoers, regardless. It is also considered one of the deadliest circuits, claiming over 20 lives in its short tenure.

The race is known for drawing an elite crowd including members of most of the world's cadet royal branches and many business magnates. It has been termed the "Après-ski" of the racing world, with a focus of the crowd being more on whose-whose rather than whose racing. The most prestigious viewing boxes for the race are situated on the bandstand set up at the entrance to the Casino Imperiau. Those financially fortunate enough to secure these seats are often patrons of not only the Levantx Grand Prèmi but of other races in a variety of racing circuits.

In 2006, a group was formed to abolish the Levantx Grand Prèmi or at least change the route to make it safer. Efforts made by the "Committees for the Preservation of Racers", known disparagingly in Burgundie as the "Commies for the PoRs", have largely been ignored except in 2012 when a member of the Committees intentionally entered the motorway and was struck by three racers. The race was postponed but ultimately reconvened four months later. It was noted that the three drivers involved in the collision have not yet raced again. The group was blamed for the emotional trauma suffered by the drivers and the audience and is currently in court proceedings in the Burgundian Lazarine Court. It is rumored that the case is seeking $45 trillion in damages to be paid out to all of those at the race, those who witnessed it on TV or streaming on the internet. It is likely that the court will not find for that amount, but the event did prompt Burgundie to change its broadcasting laws to ensure that all live broadcasts were delayed by 4 seconds to enable a blackout, and increased the liability of organizations for the actions of its members to commit "heinous acts on behalf of their organization or in line with the goals of their organization." This latter outcome is also being appealed in the Burgundian Lazarine Court.














Xingkaipese Grand Prix

Xingkai'Pei Dàjiangsài
Guójì Sàichechang Xingkai'Pei
Sepang.svg
Race information
Number of times held 51
First held 1979
Last held 2030
Most wins (drivers) TBD (7)
Most wins (constructors) TBD (11)
Circuit length 5.543 km (3.444 mi)
Race length 310.408 km (192.879 mi)
Laps 56
Last race (2030)
Pole position
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:28.076
Podium
    • 2. Ajt. Carla Helvet
    • Anghel Octan Racing
    • +9.770
    • 3. Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq, Count Valsoix
    • TBD
    • +10.519
Fastest lap
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:31.080

The Xingkaipese Grand Prix (Southern Wonjinese: Xingkai'Pei Dàjiangsài) is a race in the Grand Prix Racing calendar that has been held since 1979 on the outskirts of the national capital Jiushi. The region sees very little heavy precipitation since the race was moved to June in 1987. Prior to the move, the race was virtually universally subject to monsoon conditions which reach as far inland as the capital in the latter half of the year. Despite these changes, the race is still conducted in highly humid conditions which exacerbate the typically mild temperatures to either extreme. Yearly temperatures on the race weekend may vary from 12°C at cold extremes and 36°C at the hottest depending on oceanic currents and atmospheric pressure near the beginning of summer.

The circuit itself balances straights with hairpins and wide corners which makes it so that any given sector maintains a degree of variety. This means that passing can occur at various locations along the track and while a high-power car may pass a slower car along a straightaway, it is easier than usual for a more skillful driver to retake his/her position in subsequent turns before the next straight.

Construction of the circuit began in 1976 with Grand President Zhan Guanting policy of opening the nation to foreign investment. The conclusion of construction the following year was met with lukewarm reactions among the international community and the addition of a Xingkaipese Grand Prix did not occur until 1979 after the Xingkaipese government controversially courted the attention of the International Racing Federation. The inaugural race was widely considered disastrous as the circuit had fallen into disrepair in the years since its construction and repairs had not fully concluded by the beginning of the first race weekend. Despite a rocky start, subsequent years have managed to showcase the track's share of excellent races. The details of the relationship between upper leadership of the IRF and the Xingkaipese Union in both establishing and maintaining the event on the Grand Prix Racing calendar after dismal beginnings has only recently come to light and the full fallout of these revelations has yet to be determined.

















Pukhgundi Grand Prix

Pukgundi Graand Pree
Buddh Circuit
Jaypee International Circuit 2011.svg
Race information
Number of times held 10
First held 2020
Last held 2030
Most wins (drivers) TBD (7)
Most wins (constructors) TBD (11)
Circuit length 5.125 km (3.185 mi)
Race length 307.5 km (191.07 mi)
Laps 60
Last race (2030)
Pole position
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:21.119
Podium
    • 2. Ajt. Carla Helvet
    • Anghel Octan Racing
    • +19.823
    • 3. Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq, Count Valsoix
    • TBD
    • +20.892
Fastest lap
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:24.679

The Pukhgundi Grand Prix (Pashto: Pukgundi Graand Pree), is a Grand Prix Racing event which has been held in the city of Pradesh since 2020. The event was championed by Pukhgundian business mogul Viswanathan Chandhok who built a fortune in the chemical industry and formed a Grand Prix Racing team, Force Pukhgundi Works, to indulge his passion. After a large following for his team rapidly formed at home in Pukhgundi, Chandhok petitioned local governments for the creation of a Pukhgundian event. The province of Uttar-Pradesh agreed to the creation of a circuit in the city of Pradesh in mid-2019. Construction progressed rapidly and the circuit was approved and inaugurated the following year.

The 5,125 m circuit is simple in design; based around a set of hairpins interrupted by busstop chicanes and three straights, two of which are of significant length. Races are universally dry in the arid climate of the region with blowing dust presenting an occasional hazard. Races continue to be very well attended yet ticket prices are relatively though compared to other events and venues on the calendar. It is frequently cheaper for fans of Grand Prix Racing to travel to Pukhgundi and purchase tickets than to attend local events. Luckily for the many attendees, the track has seen many excellent races since its introduction.



























Shanjin Grand Prix

Shanjin Dajiangsei
Shanxi International Circuit
Bahrain International Circuit--Grand Prix Layout.svg
Race information
Number of times held 81
First held 1949
Last held 2030
Most wins (drivers) TBD (7)
Most wins (constructors) TBD (11)
Circuit length 5.412 km (3.363 mi)
Race length 308.405 km (191.634 mi)
Laps 57
Last race (2030)
Pole position
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:25.769
Podium
    • 2. Ajt. Carla Helvet
    • Anghel Octan Racing
    • +2.660
    • 3. Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq, Count Valsoix
    • TBD
    • +14..397
Fastest lap
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:29.798

The Shanjinese or Shanjin Grand Prix (Oriental Peninsular: Shanjin Dajiangsei), also known as the Easternmost Race in the World, is a Grand Prix Racing event held near the eastern coast of Shanjin in the city of Shanxi. The race has been held continuously since 1949 and is notable as the only event that was not interrupted at any point by the Great War making it the longest consecutively held racing event under the IRF's jurisdiction (many races continued to be held at different times during the conflict, but all events that existed prior to the Great War and persist to the modern experienced some interruption).

The Shanjin International Circuit is know as a smooth circuit with few impediments or complications. The track also has long concrete runoffs on most concerns which have been criticized on two grounds: the first that the runoffs do not sufficiently punish drivers who violate track limits unlike grass or gravel runoffs, and secondly that concrete runoffs are less safe than grass or gravel runoffs as they are less efficient at dissipating energy/speed in the event of a catastrophic failure or loss of control onboard a car. Despite these concerns, the track is generally well-liked by drivers and hosts a large number of events beyond Grand Prix Racing including junior racing series and karting events.




















Azikorian Grand Prix

Gimme yer damn location details, Azi!

Yytuskian Grand Prix

Grosser Preis der Yytuskia
Züdschleife
Hokenheimring (2in1).png
Race information
Number of times held 40
First held 1990
Last held 2030
Most wins (drivers) TBD (7)
Most wins (constructors) TBD (11)
Circuit length 4.574 km (2.842 mi)
Race length 306.442 km (190.414 mi)
Laps 67
Last race (2030)
Pole position
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:12.363
Podium
    • 2. Ajt. Carla Helvet
    • Anghel Octan Racing
    • +4.994
    • 3. Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq, Count Valsoix
    • TBD
    • +10.413
Fastest lap
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:16.442

The Yytuskian Grand Prix (German: Grosser Preis der Yytuskia) is a Grand Prix Racing event held on the Züdschleife (archaic German for "South Loop"), one of two venues that have alternated hosting the Yytuskian Grand Prix since its inaugural race in 1990. The alternate venue, the Nordschleife, was reconstituted into a government research and development testing centre and campus in 2018 leaving the Züdschleife as the sole venue to host Grand Prix Racing Series events in Yytuskia. Prior to 1990, the two loops were joined by approximately 6 km (3.7 mi) of dirt tracks forming a well known rally course popularly known as "The Schleife." Located on the outskirts of the Mühle metropolitan area, the track is densely vegetated to the degree of blocking out sunlight on occasion on sections of the famous Parabolika turn and more extensive sections of the full loop which is not used for Grand Prix Racing series races.

The most notable feature of the track is the Parabolika turn, a long and steeply banked curve which slingshots drivers through the second sector under heavy sustained G forces. The turn is followed almost immediately by a tight hairpin corner which is considered a rather difficult transition and necessitates the use of a short part of the full loop as a runoff which sees frequent use. The humid climate of the region adds further physical stress to the bodies of drivers which exacerbates the few technically difficult sections.
























Rhodennir Grand Prix

Grosser Preis der Rhodennir
Rockport Circuit
Circuit Silverstone 2011.svg
Race information
Number of times held 89
First held 1926
Last held 2030
Most wins (drivers) TBD (7)
Most wins (constructors) TBD (11)
Circuit length 5.891 km (3.66 mi)
Race length 306.291 km (190.32 mi)
Laps 52
Last race (2030)
Pole position
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:23.600
Podium
    • 2. Ajt. Carla Helvet
    • Anghel Octan Racing
    • +5.063
    • 3. Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq, Count Valsoix
    • TBD
    • +6.570
Fastest lap
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:27.621

The Rhodennir Grand Prix (Rhodennirian: Grosser Preis der Rhodennir) is a Grand Prix Series race held at the Rockport Circuit on the outskirts of Rockport City in Rhodennir. The race predates it's current venue, having previously been held on a dirt cross-country course. The modern incarnation of the event has been held on a decommissioned airfield since the 1950. The layout has seen minor alterations over the subsequent decades, but maintains its basic form with three of the straights (turns 5-6, 14-15, and 18-1) being based on old runways.

As one of the most northern events on the calendar, the event sees some of the lowest temperatures of all the Grand Prix especially since it is held in late September. The relatively flat profile of the track also contributes to a significant wind element which can alter the handling and downforces of cars unpredictably. To mitigate this effect, teams running sharkfins on their cars often remove them for this event to reduce the profile of the vehicle.






















Channelside Grand Prix

Channelside Grand Prix
Channelside Circuit
Circuit Sochi.svg
Race information
Number of times held 14
First held 2016
Last held 2030
Most wins (drivers) TBD (7)
Most wins (constructors) TBD (11)
Circuit length 5.848 km (3.634 mi)
Race length 321.64 km (199.87 mi)
Laps 55
Last race (2030)
Pole position
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:30.194
Podium
    • 2. Ajt. Carla Helvet
    • Anghel Octan Racing
    • +0.617
    • 3. Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq, Count Valsoix
    • TBD
    • +9.370
Fastest lap
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:27.909

The Channelside Grand Prix is a relatively recent additional to the Grand Prix Racing calendar. Intending to showcase Pauldustllahani development of the island, the circuit is technically a street course set inside a lavish and extensive entertainment district and many shopping establishments openly face the track from behind safety barriers. Despite this, the tarmac sees little use aside from organized racing and the barriers remain in place virtually year-round. While the track does not have the same history as courses such as the Levantx or Caphirian Grand Prix and some have characterized racing in Channelside as "lacklustre," the facilities around the track can not be characterized as such. Events held at the Channelside circuit are renowned for their pageantry.

Channelside experiences a relatively moderate maritime climate. Temperatures during the race can be hot and humid, but not as much as the extremes experienced at other venues. The track also features steady and predictable corners which are easier on tires. A notable feature of the track is the width of several 90° corners which have seen three- or even four-way battles on rare occasions.




















Kistani Grand Prix

Gran Kistan Praefio
Spetsford Interior Circuit
Spetsford Circuit.png
Race information
First held 1984
Last held 2030
Most wins (drivers) 23x15px TBD (6)
Most wins (constructors) 23x15px TBD (7)
Circuit length 6.080 km (3.778 mi)
Race length 431.680 km (268.234 mi)
Laps 71
Last race (2030)
Pole position
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • TBD
Podium
    • 2. Ajt. Carla Helvet
    • Anghel Octan Racing
    • TBD
    • 3. Olav Kinston
    • TBD
    • TBD
Fastest lap
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • TBD

The Spetsford Grand Prix is an annual racing event held along the coast of Felva Isle, near the port city of the same name. With slightly warm and humid weather over low, rolling hills, the track's curves are known to be very forgiving, and the wide, rather than long, starting placement of contestants makes the race hinge almost entirely on the drivers' skill rather than their engine. Upsets are therefore commonplace, and more often than not drivers can either fall hopelessly behind or make spectacular returns with very little room for error. Still, the track has been known to be unusually safe, with the exception of the stands. The primary challenge to drivers is carefully managing pit stops and outwitting other drivers, rather than focusing on hairpin turns or rough terrain.





















Kiravian Grand Prix

Kiravix Ambrix Prix
Strathannan Circuit
Hungaroring.svg
Race information
Number of times held 89
First held 1937
Last held 2030
Most wins (drivers) TBD (7)
Most wins (constructors) TBD (11)
Circuit length 4.381 km (2.722 mi)
Race length 306.663 km (190.560 mi)
Laps 70
Last race (2030)
Pole position
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:14.276
Podium
    • 2. Ajt. Carla Helvet
    • Anghel Octan Racing
    • +.908
    • 3. Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq, Count Valsoix
    • TBD
    • +7.462
Fastest lap
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:17.182

The Kiravian Grand Prix (Kiravic Coscivian: Kiravix Ambrix Prix) has been held at the Strathannan Circuit since its first occurrence in 1937 even before the establishment of the IRF and the modern Grand Prix Racing series. While motorsports in Kiravia have never been as prominent as fieldball or hockey, the nation has a strong history of racing dating back centuries. Prior to its revitalization in 1936, the Strathannan Circuit was used as a cross-country racing footpath. In its original form which saw use until the early 19th century, the course was precisely 2.6 mi in length and competitors raced to complete 10 laps in one of the most grueling marathons in history. In 1936, the patronage of a local wealthy automobile enthusiast saw the rough path of the circuit reclaimed and motor racing began the subsequent year, though it wasn't until 1942 that the full length of the course was paved.

Today, the Kiravian Grand Prix remains one of the most well-attended races and, while not as grueling as footracing, the rapid elevation changes demand adaptability and control on the part of drivers. The circuit lends itself well to high-powered cars while a series of switchbacks at the end of a lap have led to technically superior drivers making last minute comebacks. On average, the Kiravian Grand Prix has had the most upsets in which a driver will lead for the majority of a lap or even a race only to be overtaken within the last three turns.






















Caphiravian Grand Prix

Grandis Praemi Caphirias
Circus Volias
Circus Volias.png
Race information
Number of times held 101
First held 1925
Last held 2030
Most wins (drivers) TBD (7)
Most wins (constructors) TBD (11)
Circuit length 7.004 km (4.352 mi)
Race length 322.184 km (200.192 mi)
Laps 46
Last race (2030)
Pole position
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:40.553
Podium
    • 2. Ajt. Carla Helvet
    • Anghel Octan Racing
    • +1.358
    • 3. Franc-Jean Hippolyte deBedecq, Count Valsoix
    • TBD
    • +8.791
Fastest lap
  • TBD
  • TBD
  • 1:44.577

The Caphiravian Grand Prix (Imperial Latin: Grandis Praemi Caphirias) is one of the oldest motorsports circuits in continual use. Racing began taking place at the venue in the first quarter of the 20th century on a dirt course twice the length of the current tarmac. While the length has been reduced over the decades, it remains one of the longest tracks in terms of lap length in Grand Prix Racing. Located outside the town of Volis in the province Arveni, the circuit is set against the rolling hills of the province's countryside. Sections of the track and amenities surrounding the track are considered historic and have been preserved as identifiable landmarks. The race is one of the best attended annually, owing both the the size and capacity of the circuit as well as its prestige and popularity.

The length of the track creates inherently difficulty for new drivers attempting to memorize the circuit. While located in a relatively temperate continental climate, the region is prone to rain and/or overcast weather which can alter rapidly on the open plains. Strong winds may also become a factor on sections of the track. Its size and location on the rolling hills outside of Volis also makes for some dramatic elevation changes, in fact the largest in the series at 102.2 m (335.3 ft) between the highest and lowest points. While generally gradual, turns 3-5 (commonly referred to as Aqua Rubrum) are located on a steep rise. Cars climb 22 m (72 ft) in elevation over a track distance of 20 m (66 ft). The greatest challenge in Aqua Rubrum is in successfully negotiating the three turns uphill while maintaining speeds of over 320 km/h (approx. 200 mph).



















Constructors

     Anghel Octan Racing

Main article: Anghel Octan Racing

Anghel Octan Racing, also known as Anghel Racing or AOR is a Monteangelo-based Grand Prix Racing team. Partially funded and operated by the Monteangeline Gendarmeria, many of the staff and technicians for the team are ranking members of the Monteangeline paramilitary forces. The other major shareholder and sponsor of the team is the Octan Petroleum Company, an international oil conglomerate, which supplies fuel and technical personnel for the team. While Monteangelo has hosted a Grand Prix since 1972 and despite racing at lower levels being a common pastime, the national top-level racing team has only raced since 2006. While the team has never won a Constructors title, it has proven to be a strong midfield team with even stronger showings in recent years.

Since the early 1990s, the Monteangeline government had expressed interest in developing a top-level racing team to compete on the international stage, but annual budgetary allowances to the Sport e atletica ed gieu Department of the Gendarmeria were considered insufficient. In 2005, the Monteangeline government were able to attract the sponsorship of the Octan Petroleum Company which provides 50% of funding in exchange for 50% controlling shares in the team. While the majority of the team is staffed by the Gendarmeria, many of the technical personnel and the team principal, Marcus Samos, are employees of Octan.

Currently, the two primary drivers for Anghel Octan Racing are Ajutant Carla Helvet, a 28 year old veteran driver and junior officer in the Gendarmeria, and Tchef Gendarme Gion Hilaire, a 22 year old rookie driver and non-commissioned officer in the Gendarmeria. Henri St. Gallen, a 26 year old civilian, is the team's reserve and test driver. Aside from team principal Marcus Samos, other key personnel include technical director Adrien Neui, chief engineer Frédritch St. Gallen (no relation to reserve driver Henri), and Gendarmeria liaison Capitan Artur Sgalta.

     Force Pukhgundi Works

Force Pukhgundi Works is a Grand Prix Racing team assembled by Viswanathan Chandhok, a Pukhgundi businessman and self-made billionaire in industrial chemicals. Chandhok formed the team in 2018 after purchasing the assets of the historied but wavering Team Force Auto. After acquiring TFA's assets, Chandhok relocated the team to a workshop on the outskirts of Pukhjabad and recruited race, development, and reserve drivers from various nationalities. The current lineup of race drivers includes Timo Basuda and Odashi Kimi, Ormati and Mutsutorese expats respectively who have maintained residency within Pukhjabad's affluent city centre since they were both recruited to the team in 2027. The team has largely stayed in the midfield, but has flirted with successes at many different times. While the team currently has a single victory in over a decade of its history, it has obtained a number of podium finishes.

Force Pukgundi Works has remained immensely popular in Pukhgundi and Chandhok's support of a team for Pukgundians has largely rehabilitated his reputation following a massive disaster at one of his chemical plants in 2016 which led to the deaths of thousands of people within and living around the plant. Some sources have speculated that this incident served as an impetus for Chandhok to develop a Grand Prix Racing team as public calls for an inquiry into the liability of Chandhok and his business filled news headlines in the time following the disaster. The call rapidly abated following the acquisition of TFA and Chandhok remains a popular and inspiring figure of self-made success among Pukhgundians who is able to share his success in part through his racing team.

     Hermès S.A.

Écurie Hermès S.A. competing as Écurie Hermès (pronounced [ekyʁi ɛʁmɛ]) is the official name of the racing division of luxury Insuian auto manufacturer, Hermès, and the racing team that competes in IRF racing. It is one of the oldest surviving and most successful IRF teams, having competed in every world championship since the 1950 IRF season.

The team was founded by Alexia Hermès, initially to race cars produced by Qara, though by 1947 Hermès had begun building its own cars. Among its important achievements outside IRF are winning the World Sportscar Championship, 24 Hours of Avana, 24 Hours of Venice Beach, 12 Hours of Auvergne, races for Grand tourer cars and racing on road courses of the Tuscany, the Millau Piste and the Carrera Panodros.

As a constructor, Hermès has a record 16 Constructors' Championships, the last of which was won in 2012. Roberto LeBlanc, Jorge Manila, Carlos Ascari, Nathan Cross, Raymond Perry, Nikita Monroe, Laura Lauren, Kamari Childs, and Jacob Asana have won a record 15 Drivers' Championships for the team. Since Asana's title in 2007 the team narrowly lost out on the 2008 drivers' title with Pedro Malara and the 2010 and 2012 drivers' titles with Alequé Silva. Childs is the team's most successful driver. Joining the team in 1996 and departing in 2006 he won five drivers' titles and 72 Grands Prix for the team. His titles came consecutively between 2000 and 2004. Including the constructors' title of 1999 consecutively being won until the end of 2004, this was the team's most successful period.

Currently, World Champions Jacob Asana and Alequé Silva are the two main race drivers.

The team is also known for its passionate support base known as the Hermesi. The Insuian Grand Prix at Georgetown is regarded as the team's home race.

     Imperial Cola Racing

Imperial Cola Racing is a broad division under the Imperial Beverage brand that includes teams in many different sports and events across the world. The division is part of one of the most extensive and successful marketing schemes in history, projecting the brand as "extreme" and genuinely invested in action and thrill-seeking. The young Grand Prix Racing team was established in 2014 after the brand had already made expansions into both Moto GP and stock car racing. The team is technically formed from the assets of the Imperial Blue Grand Prix team which had been primarily sponsored by Imperial Beverage since 1999. After the existing owner announced his retirement, Imperial unsurprisingly bought out the team and trimmed away most of the existing assets, bringing aboard new technical expertise and drivers.

Despite enjoying great success in its early years, including shocking world driver's and constructor's championships in 2019, Imperial's success waned to a degree in the mid-2020s. A contributing factor may have been the departure of technical director Adrien Neui in 2024, who returned to the sport in 2029 with Anghel Octan Racing. Despite these setbacks, the team's prospects in the early-2030s seem promising. With two young drivers who dominated their respective junior series a couple years apart, the team is forecasted to make a comeback.

     O'Shea HIS Motorsports

O'Shea HIS Motorsports is the official name of the racing car manufacturing division of O'Shea Heavy Industrial Systems, and the racing team that competes in IRF racing. Its cars and team did well in the 70s-90s but have suffered recently as their most talented engineers passed away or were poached by other divisions of HIS or other contractors. Despite the team's struggles, they maintain a reasonably large fanbase as a part of racing heritage and history.

     Quicksilver Racing

Quicksilver Racing is a Grand Prix Racing team operated by Quicksilver Industries. While most of the technical staff are contracted under the Amazon Motors subsidiary of Quicksilver, the brand of the racing team is more broad and encompasses the accomplishments of many of Quicksilver's subsidiaries and divisions with the organization. In the early days prior to and subsequent to the founding of the IRF, Amazon Motors was very active in the global racing community and Amazon-powered cars dominated most events across the world. This dominance came to an end in 1955 when a horrific accident during an endurance race led to the deaths of at least 80 spectators with speculative death tolls running as high as 120. Following the event, Amazon immediately withdrew from all motorsports fearing the repercussions that such associations could have on their brand.

In 2005, 50 years after the accident which saw their withdrawal from the sport, Quicksilver Racing reentered into Grand Prix Racing, placing emphasis on the legacy of Amazon Motors in motorsports history. The team is perhaps the most highly funded currently in the paddock and has had strong performances since their return, but have not been able to replicate their performances prior to 1955 in which Amazon cars won 4/5 IRF Grand Prix Championships and numerous other accolades prior to the founding of the IRF.

     Racing Grand Premi deBedecq

With the passing of his grandfather in 2018 he formally took over ownership of Racing Grand Premi deBedecq and appointed himself as an alternate driver. Abandoning his amateur racing career to focus on the F1 racing he was able to push his own primary driver off of the team and take his place. This created some hostility between Franc-Jean and a number of other drivers who saw him as a relic of a by-gone era where privilege was more important than skill. Despite the prejudice, he was able to prove himself time and again and earned the respect of many drivers and fans alike. His manner off the racetrack, as a magnanimous and welcoming host, helped to soften his image. He invited many of his friends and enemies alike and treated them all well.

As the owner of Racing Grand Premi deBedecq, he has invested millions in R&D both for his own team and others, particularly Anghel Octan Racing, in hopes of bringing the sport fully into the 21st century. This diversification beyond his own team has proved very profitable and has allowed Franc-Jean to invest more heavily in other ventures. His largest acquisition to date was Marchal Solutions d'Assise (MSA), the contractor that constructs the viewing stands for the Levantx Grand Prix. Not only does he profit from the service contract but then he sells the seats themselves to racegoers, particularly his well-heeled friends.

Specifications

2031 Technical Specifications

Engine (majors) 2-litre V6 or V8 turbo engine and two Energy Recovery Systems (ERS) with ~800 hp.

  • Exhaust: Single exhaust with central exit
  • Intake: Variable length intake system

Chassis

  • Fuel capacity: 150 L according to IRF Grand Prix Racing regulations, 100 kg is equivalent to 130–140 L per race
  • Gearbox: 8-speed, fixed ratio
  • Front downforce wing: Maximum width of wing increased from 1,700 mm to 1,950 mm
  • Rear downforce wing: Shallower rear wing flap
  • Car weight: Minimum weight increased by 49 kg, up from 602 kg to 651 kg
  • Length: Minimum of 5,000 mm and maximum of 5,200 (in event of a "photo finish" the steering wheel is the point of reference for crossing the line rather than the nose)
  • Height: Nose and chassis height reduced (the height of the chassis has been reduced from 625 mm to 525 mm, whilst the height of the nose has been dramatically slashed from 550 mm to 185 mm).

Stock Racing

The Stock Series governed by the IRF is a stock car racing series. Stock Serires races are held on oval counter-clockwise tracks. These races can prove highly technical and physically demanding on the drivers due to consistent high speeds and the length of the races which demand endurance on the part of the driver and his or her team.

Moto Racing

Enduro Racing

Organizational Structure

Regulations and standards

Championship points

Championships for each IRF series are granted both to drivers and constructors. Winning a championship follows a standardized system across all series governed by the IRF. Point are accumulated according to the finishing place of a driver in each race. Constructors accumulate points for both of their drivers while all drivers compete with each other regardless of team relationships. In the event that a race is ended before 75% of the race distance is covered, half points will be awarded according to the places at the time the race was ended. If the race fails to run 50% of the full length, no points will be awarded for that race. Attribution of points has changed several times over the the decades of the IRF's history, but currently follows the pattern below to the right:

Points awarded for finishing
Position Points
1st 20
2nd 15
3rd 12
4th 10
5th 8
6th 6
7th 4
8th 3
9th 2
10th 1

Super licencing

Competing in any of the top level racing series governed by the IRF requires the granting of a super licence. Super licences are granted after the accumulation of points through various national and international series recognized by the IRF as feeder series. Currently, the standard to secure a super licence is the accumulation of 50 points within a period of three years. Typically, achieving first, second, or third place within a junior international series will grant a full 50 points and similar results in a junior national series will grant 25 points. Lower place finishes will grant fewer points, but nevertheless count towards a super licence. Regardless of the level or series in which the points were accumulated, a super licence grants a driver the freedom to drive in any event in any IRF racing series so long as they have the support of a team. While exceedingly rare, driver-owned and operated teams are permitted, though potentially extremely cost prohibitive.

A super licence requires a nominal renewal fee of $5,000 annually. In addition, penalty points accumulated on a super licence increase the renewal fee by $2,500 per point. Penalty points may be assigned by IRF race stewards in response to especially egregious on-track violations in addition to other sanctions. Drivers who accumulate 12 penalty points within a year are subject to extreme sanctions, including possibly revocation of the license. Penalty points expire exactly one year from the date they were assigned.

Cars and technology

Specifications for vehicles within each series change frequently. The redrafting of specifications such as weight and size limits generally occur every five years in the Grand Prix Racing series and every seven years in Stock Racing. The IRF Moto Series has never gone through a complete redrafting in its history. Even so, each series will typically see two or three rule modifications every year in order to encourage innovation or to ban certain technologies which take away the reliance on the driver's ability or are unsafe.

Many technologies now common in consumer road cars have been developed in the top-level IRF series. These technologies include modern crumple zones, anti-lock braking system, kinetic energy recovery systems, and traction control, among others.